“Towards Abstraction” Day Three

I continued mostly to experiment with the masking tape making hard edged constructions. This was to reach the end of that single idea before combining it with my other Cubistic work. I wanted to work out what the best processes for making these purely abstract planes of colour would be.

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“Fifth Study”

I found immediately that switching to acrylic paint was the best course of action. It is much easier to manipulate for one thing (and much easier to clean, ho ho), but more importantly when layering up the paper with masking tape constantly the work needs to dry quickly before adding the next shape.

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“Sixth Study”

I also found that pure, unmixed colour looks much better on the page. This is a theme in the work of various hard edge American painters, for instance Frank Stella and Ellsworth Kelly.

Some of Frank Stella’s early monochrome paintings.

Frank Stella presumably driving himself completely insane with concentration while working on one of his famous Black Paintings.

Anyway I’ll do some other post about all that history.

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“Seventh Study”- here I tried superimposing planes of colour over one another.

My other findings were colour and paint based. I noticed that very simple colour combinations work best, like black and blue, or white and yellow. When colour is so pure it starts to strain the eyes when there are lots of combinations.

I noticed also that certain paints work better with the masking tape. My blue and black acrylics tend to leak slightly through the tape, whereas the white and yellow paints leave brilliantly clean lines. I’m sure this has something to do with the consistency of the paint; furthermore, there must be some way of changing the consistency of other colours to match this. If I could find that out I might be able to use any colour which would be fantastical.

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“Eighth Study”- both a painting and a useful study. Notice how the white has clean edges and a weirdly pleasing tactile textural aspect. The ripples of paint…

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